People

Our Team

Meet the current and past members of MBL.

  • Current Position

    Research Fellow, Stanford University School of Engineering

    Education

    • B.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2018
  • Current Position

    Research Engineer, CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, Alabama

  • Research Interests

    • Musculoskeletal biomechanics
    • Cartilage tissue friction and wear

    Education

    • B.S. California Polytechnic State University, Mechanical Engineering, 2005
    • M.S. California Polytechnic State University, Mechanical Engineering, 2007
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2015

    Sevan received both B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from California Polytechnic State University in the idyllic coastal town of San Luis Obispo. He moved to New York in Fall 2009 when he began work in Dr. Gerard Ateshian's Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory. His area of research interest includes tissue friction and wear, specifically the connection between the low friction coefficient and incredible wear resistant properties of articular cartilage.

    In his spare time Sevan enjoys ice cream, cooking, cycling, and bearing the brunt of the lab's West Coast envy.

  • Research Interests

    • Musculoskeletal tissue engineering
    • Computational modelling of tissues
    • Bioengineering knowledge transfer to business and industry

    Education

    • B.S. Zaragoza University, Mechanical Engineering, 2010
    • M.S. Aragon Institute of Engineering Research, Biomedical Engineering, 2011
    • M.Phil. Zaragoza University, 2012

    Work Experience

    • Academic visitor, Centre for Mathematical Biology, University of Oxford, 2013
    • Teaching assistant, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Zaragoza University, Spain, 2014

    Born and educated in Zaragoza, Spain. Sara is developing her Ph. D. in Biomedical Engineering in 3D computational simulation of cartilage behaviour. Currently, she collaborates with Dr. Gerard Ateshian's Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory to study the effect of external bath pH on articular cartilage swelling. Her research interests include development and FE implementation of constitutive models for hard and soft tissues, interaction between tissues and biomaterials, and mechanobiological models for cellular processes. Sara is especially interested in clinical applications of biomedical research and developing processes for bioengineering companies. When outside of lab, Sara enjoys studying her own cartilage in amazing Yoga sessions in Central Park and taking photos of stunning landscapes.

  • Research Interests

    • Nutrient transport in tissue engineering
    • Growth and remodeling

     

    Education

    • B.S. Boston University, Biomedical Engineering, 2010
    • M.S. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2012
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2017

    Bob joined the MBL in the fall of 2010 working to formulate and validate computational models which describe the growth and development of engineered cartilage. Ultimately, the goal is to develop experimentally informed models to predict the compositional and mechanical properties of engineered tissues based on the prevailing culture conditions (construct geometry, cell density, nutrient supply).

    When not enhancing the nutrient availability in engineered cartilage, Bob enhances the nutrient availability in his vegetable gardens.

  • Current Position

    Data science analyst, INARI Research Lab

    Education

    • B.S. University of Miami, Mechanical Engineering, May 2016
    • M.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, May 2019
  • Current Position

    Founder and CEO, Biomed Consulting, Inc.

    Research Areas

    • Finite element modeling / computer simulation and in vitro mechanical material testing of natural and reconstructed bones, joints and soft tissues
    • Osteoarthritis
    • Gait analysis
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Venous ulcers
    • Medical devices (Intelligent surgical power tool to prevent thermal necrosis during surgical bone and joint reconstructions, interpneumatic compressive boot for the treatment of venous ulcers)

    Education

    • B.Tech. (Hons) University of Mauritius, Mechanical Engineering, 1991
    • M.Phil. University of Mauritius, Mechanical Engineering, 1994
    • Ph.D. Anglia Ruskin University, Bioengineering, 2001
    • M.B.A. Anglia Ruskin University, 2005
    • PG Diploma Anglia Ruskin University, Teaching and Learning, 2008
    • Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, Anglia Ruskin University, 2014

    Awards

    January / March 2013

    • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting Best Poster in the knee category
    • Association of radiographic knee osteoarthritis and pain with gait asymmetry: the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study
    • Displayed at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting among top-scored Orthopaedic Research Society posters

    April 2012

    • Mimics Innovation Award; Winner of Open Category
    • Development and Verification of a Computational Model of the Knee Joint for the Evaluation of Surgical Treatments for Osteoarthritis
    • Selected for publication in Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering

    June 2011

    • Best podium presentation
    • Conservative surgical treatments for osteoarthritis: An integrated computational and in vitro study
    • Meditech/ARU Medical Engineering Conference

    December 2008

    • Translational Research Award winner, Orthopaedics Innovation Awards category
    • Medical Futures Innovation Award
    • Electrospinning nanocoating for orthopaedic implants

    Rajshree Mootanah embarked on a PhD on total hip replacement in 1997, funded by the Chelmsford Medical Education and Research Trust, following 5 years in industry. Results of this study revealed that surgical fixation techniques, as well as bone quality and morphology, affect implant longevity. The proposed subject-specific surgical fixation techniques were translated to patients by orthopedic surgeons involved in this study.  Dr Mootanah pursued a postdoctoral research fellowship and worked on several Biomechanics projects, funded by DePuy, a Johnson and Johnson company. In 2005, after completing an MBA degree, she accepted a lectureship position in Mechanical Engineering at Anglia Ruskin University in Chelmsford, UK, and moved up to Associate Professor level in 2015.  

    Dr Mootanah has led the Medical Engineering Research Group since 2008 and focused on applying engineering solutions to the problem of osteoarthritis through research on computational modeling of surgical reconstruction techniques and implant design for the diseased joint. She has also been Principal Investigator on externally-funded research projects, including mechanical testing of joints, the design and development of medical devices, as well as venous ulcers, Parkinson’s Disease and movement analysis.

    Dr Mootanah has been a Visiting Scientist at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) since 2009, conducting computer modeling and simulation research on osteoarthritis-related projects to complement in vitro and in vivo experimental research conducted at the HSS. She has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Mascara since 2013, mentoring a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and his PhD students in dental biomechanics. Dr Mootanah is an editorial board member and guest editor for a number of Bioengineering scientific journals. 

  • Current Position

    Associate Professor of Biomechanics (in Orthopaedic Surgery), Dept of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University

    Research Interests

    • Cartilage mechanics
    • Cartilage tissue engineering

    Education

    • B.S. Boston University, Biomedical Engineering, 2000
    • M.S. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2002
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2006
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2006

    Nadeen's Ph.D. co-sponsors were Profs. Gerard Ateshian and Clark Hung.  After completing her Ph.D. at Columbia, Nadeen did a postdoc fellowship at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.  She subsequently took a faculty position at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in New York.  She is currently Associate Professor of Biomechanics in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Columbia.

  • Current Position

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA.

    Research Interests

    • Solute transport in soft tissues and gels
    • Osmotic loading of cells

    Education

    • B.S. Binghamton University, Mechanical Engineering, May 2003
    • M.S. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, May 2005
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, May 2008
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, May 2010
    • Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Mechanical Engineering, March 2014

    Michael began working in the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory in the Summer of 2004 as a Masters student in Biomedical Engineering. Shortly after this period, since it was determined that he was an invaluable asset to the lab, Michael was strongly urged to continue his research as a Doctoral student. Michael's current research focuses on solute transport in dynamically loaded porous media and solute partitioning in the cellular cytoplasm.

    In his spare time, and while at work, Michael spends countless hours reading the Daily Racing Form while listening to Steely Dan.

  • Education

    • B.S. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2020

    Michael Anne is a sophomore from Oklahoma studying biomedical engineering. After earning her undergraduate degree, she plans to attend medical school. In her free time, she enjoys running, chasing pigeons through the park, and scouring Trader Joe's for the best bananas. Her spirit animal is the manatee.

  • Current Position

    Director - Medtronic

    Research Interests

    • Cartilage mechanics
    • Cartilage tribology

    Education

    • B.S. University of Wisconsin - Madison, Mechanical Engineering, 1994
    • M.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 1996
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 1999
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2000

    After graduation, Mike worked as an Engineer at Thoratec, as a Principal Engineer at Covidien then at Becton Dickinson. He is currently Director at Medtronic, in Fairfield, CT.

  • Current Position

    Product Manager - Elsevier

    Research Interests

    • Cartilage tribology and wear
    • Joint arthroplasty
    • Design of testing devices

    Education

    • B.S. Politecnico di Torino, Mechanical Engineering, 2003
    • M.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2006
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2008
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2010

    Matteo is originally from Italy where he got his Bachelors and Masters from Politecnico di Torino and Ecole Centrale de Lyon. In New York he attended Columbia University, where he obtained a PhD in Mechanical Engineering thanks to a dissertation on the frictional properties of articular cartilage. 

    His research interests are cartilage lubrication and innovative joint prosthesis design. 

    Matteo is married to Patricia and they recently had a beautiful baby girl named Giovanna. 

    In his spare time he does a lot of sports (and complains for getting injured), learns photography and hangs out in the city with his girls.

  • Martin visited and worked in MBL during the summer of his third year of his undergraduate studies as a student at Ecole Polytechnique in France.

  • Marina is originally from New Jersey and is studying Biomedical Engineering at the University of Rochester in snowy upstate NY. In the lab, Marina harvests strips for friction testing, runs OHP and GAG assays, works with the 3D scanner, and runs mechanical tests. Outside of the lab, Marina likes wearing down her cartilage in the gym, drinking too much coffee, and binge watching James Bond movies.

  • Lucie is a visiting Master's student in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Lorraine in France performing her internship over the summer of 2014. Her research project involves studying cartilage matrix remodeling and mechanotransduction via the TGF-ß signaling pathway in tissue explants. Lucie has also worked on optimizing protocols for both histological assessment of cartilage matrix proteins and biochemical quantification of collagen in cartilage explants and tissue engineered constructs. Lucie's background is in molecular biology and she hopes to continue to translate these skills into bioengineering applications by pursuing a PhD upon completion of her Master's degree. In her spare time, Lucie likes to explore New York City and especially enjoys exploring Japanese-American culture. In addition Lucie likes to run around the department, drink VitaminWater, and eat fresh blueberries. Back home in France, she practices equestrian sports and snowboarding.

  • Education

    • Diplôme d'ingénieur, Biology and Interfaces, École Polytechnique 2018

    Léa Montégut is a visiting masters student from Ecole Polytechnique in France.

  • Education

    • B.E. Cooper Union, Engineering, May 2009
    • M.E. Cooper Union, Mechanical Engineering, Jan 2011

    About

    Krista began working in the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory in the Fall of 2012 as a graduate student in Biomedical Engineering. Prior to joining the lab, she completed her master's thesis as a collaborative work between Cooper Union and Dr. Clark Hung's Cellular Engineering Laboratory at Columbia. This project aimed to improve tissue engineered cartilage growth by increasing solute availability to encapsulated cells. This has translated into new work exploring growth factor transport in engineered cartilage tissue. Krista currently studies cartilage mechanics, tribology, and cartilage damage toward a better understanding of osteoarthritis onset and prevention.

    In her spare time, Krista enjoys dynamically loading her own cartilage in yoga and riding her bicycle around Manhattan. She also enjoys sci-fi books and films as she ponders the future of regenerative medicine.

  • Research Interests

    • Osteoarthritis treatment
    • Mechanical properties of cartilage tissue
    • Interface mechanics
    • Collagen crosslinking
    • Finite element modeling of biological tissues

    Education

    • B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 2019
    • M.S. Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, 2021

    Awards

    • Columbia University Presidential Fellowship, 2019
    • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, Honorable Mention, 2020

    About

    Originally from Yorktown Heights, NY, Kim conducted undergraduate research at Boston University in the Growth Factor Mechanobiology Laboratory, studying the use of Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for early stage osteoarthritis. It was this work which motivated her to pursue a research career in biomechanics and join MBL in the Fall of 2019 as an MS-Ph.D student in mechanical engineering. At MBL her work focuses on using collagen crosslinking as a technique for cartilage repair and regeneration, and incorporates computational modeling to better understand the articular cartilage mechanics. 

  • Research Interests

    • Translational Research
    • Cartilage Biomechanics
    • Cartilage Morphogenesis

    Education

    • B.S. University of California Berkeley, Bioengineering, 2018
    • M.S. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2020

    About

    Originally from the Silicon Valley in California, Katherine completed her B.S. in bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Here she worked in the Gronert optometry lab looking at the lipidomic markers that regulate ocular immunity in order to examine the eye's immunoprivileged status. From here, she moved on to the O'Connell joint biomechanics lab in order to examine the role of glycosaminoglycans on the hydration and tissue mechanics of intervertebral discs. Katherine began her work with the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics lab in August of 2018 as a MS/Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering.

    Outside of the lab, Katherine enjoys birding, climbing, and most power tools.

  • Research Interests

    • Computational Biomechanics and FEA
    • Mixture Theory
    • Fluid-Structure Interactions
    • Computational Fluid Dynamics
    • Porous Media Mechanics
    • Mass Transfer

    Education

    • B.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2015
    • M.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2016
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2018
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2021

    Awards

    • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship   

    Originally from Queens, NY, Jay started as a undergrad at Columbia when he joined MBL. His primary research work was on TGF-beta activation and homeostasis in native and tissue engineered cartilage. He was the king of ELISAs and lord of explant cutting (as depicted in the image).

    After receiving his BS in mechanical engineering in 2015, Jay decided to peacefully abdicate to explore new lands in the realm mixture theory and finite element analysis using FEBio. In his spare time he roots for the NY Mets and the Giants while finding good restaurants around the city.

    Upon completion of his Ph.D., Jay headed to Siemens to work as an Application Support Engineer.

  • Current Position

    Assistant Professor in practice, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Miami.

    Research Interests

    • Cartilage mechanics and tribology

    Education

    • M.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2000
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2004
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2006
  • Hadley is an undergraduate student in the class of 2017 at Wesleyan University and is originally from New York City. Her research over the summer of 2014 involves mechanical and biochemical testing of tissue engineered cartilage. She particularly enjoys using the multichannel pipette for plate reader assays.

    Apart from lab work, Hadley likes to explore the city through a camera lens, experiment with trying to play the guitar and drums, and sketch at the Met.

  • Education

    • B.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 1986
    • M.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 1987
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 1990
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 1991

    Active Areas of Research

    • Theoretical and experimental analysis of articular cartilage mechanics
    • Theoretical and experimental analysis of cartilage lubrication
    • Growth and remodeling of biological tissues
    • Cell mechanics
    • Mixture theory for biological tissues: Theory, experiments, and computational analysis
    • Thermodynamics
    • Computational fluid and solid mechanics

    Past Areas of Research

    • Stereophotogrammetry, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography techniques for reconstruction of musculoskeletal anatomy
    • Geometric modeling, surface-fitting, and curvature analysis of diarthrodial joint articular surfaces
    • Experimental determination of diarthrodial joint kinematics and contact
    • Modeling of diarthrodial joints
    • Biomechanics of the knee, shoulder, and hand
    • Computer-aided surgical planning
    • Cartilage tissue engineering and bioreactor design

    Gerard Ateshian's research combines theoretical, computational, and experimental methods to address the biomechanics of biological soft tissues and cells. His initial focus of research addressed the biomechanics of diarthrodial joints, including the measurement and analysis of their kinematics and contact mechanics, and the quantitative assessment of articular surface topgraphy and cartilage thickness. These studies were followed by the investigation of cartilage mechanics, with a focus on the disparity between the tensile and compressive properties of this tissue, and the pressurization of its interstitial fluid under loading. Direct measurements of this interstitial fluid pressure brough new insights and evidence with regard to cartilage lubrication, which became a major topic of investigation in the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory.

    Since 1996, Prof. Ateshian has established a close collaboration with Professor Clark T. Hung in the area of cartilage tissue engineering. This highly fruitful collaboration has led to important breakthroughs in this field, with notable advances in the understanding of the role of mechanical loading in engineered cartilage growth and development. This collaborative effort has also extended to the fields of solute transport in loaded tissues and tissue constructs, and cell mechanics, producing insights into the cell's mechano-electrochemical environment and its response to mechanical and osmotic loading.

    Prof. Ateshian has also invested significant efforts in the modeling of biological tissues and cells using Mixture Theory. He has placed a particular effort in understanding the role of chemical reactions in mixtures, to address important challenges such as the modeling of tissue growth, and active transport processes.

    Insights gained from these studies have led to other stimulating collaborations, with Professor Kevin D. Costa in the investigation of the role of proteoglycans in vascular wall mechanics, and with Professor David Elad in the area of oocyte mechanics.

    To promote greater dissemination of these theoretical advances in the modeling of biological tissues, Prof. Ateshian has established a close collaboration with Professor Jeffrey A. Weiss of the University of Utah. In an effort involving several members of Columbia's Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory and Utah's Musculoskeletal Research Laboratories, these investigators are developing a free, open source, finite element program to model mechanics and transport in tissues and cells.

  • Emma is an undergraduate in the class of 2017 at Emory University and is originally from Los Angeles. She primarily works with the 3D scanner as well as helping out with OHP and GAG assays. In the future she intends on pursuing a career in medcine. Outside of the lab, she enjoys playing soccer, watching Greys Antatomy and rooting for the Lakers.

  • Deyanisse is a sophomore at Barnard College. Deyanisse plans to pursue a career in Biomedical Engineering. When not labeling tubes in the lab, Deyanisse enjoys reading books and laying in the grass. 

  • Research Interests

    • Articular Cartilage Wear and Damage
    • Treatment of Osteoarthritis

    Education

    • Sc.B. Brown University, Biomedical Engineering, 2018
    • M.S. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2020

    Originally from Upstate NY, CV began research with the lab in August of 2018 as a MS/Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering. Prior to joining the lab, CV completed an Sc.B. at Brown University in biomedical engineering, and conducted research on the biomechanics of the wrist. This work motivated continued research in the field of biomechanics.

    Outside of the lab, CV enjoys writing and performing stand up and sketch comedy.

  • Research Interests

    • Osteoarthritis treatment & surgical techniques
    • Medical device design
    • Computational modeling
    • Articular cartilage friction and wear

    Education

    • B.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, 2017
    • M.S. Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, 2019
    • M.Phil. Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, 2021

    About

    Courtney began working in the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Lab in January 2018 as a master’s student before starting her Ph.D. work in the fall of 2018. Prior to beginning at Columbia, Courtney attended the University of Washington in Seattle, WA as an undergraduate. While at UW, she worked with a team to design and build a compression device to treat and heal venous ulcers, which resulted in a provisional patent. The design process and direct clinical application of this project drew Courtney into the world of biomechanics. 

    Nowadays with MBL Courtney has pivoted from ulcers to cartilage. Her interests include studying cartilage wear and damage as well as osteoarthritis treatment methods and finite element modeling. Her current work focuses on osteoarthritis, from designing and patenting surgical tools to verifying novel surgical techniques using finite element analysis (FEBio). 

    In her spare time, Courtney enjoys running, concerts, food, playing lacrosse, and exploring New York. As a Utah native, she is obsessed with skiing, hiking, and just the mountains in general.

  • Current Position

    Associate Manager, Technical Writing • Edwards Lifesciences

    Research Interests

    • Cartilage mechanics

    Education

    • B.S. Union College, 2001
    • M.S. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2003
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2006
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Biomedical Engineering, 2009
  • Research Interests

    • cell membrane transport
    • cell homeostasis
    • Mixture theory and multiphasic mechanics
    • Finite element method and multiphasic modeling (FEBio)

    Education

    • B.S. National Taiwan University, Physics, 2004
    • M.S. National Taiwan University, Mechanical Engineering, 2007
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2018

    Working Experience

    • Research Assistant, Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, USA, 2012~2018
    • Research Engineer, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, USA, 2011~2012
    • Teaching assistant, National Taiwan University, 2010~2011
    • Associate researcher, Sanyang Industry Co., Ltd, 2007~2009

    Born and educated in Taipei, Taiwan. Chieh is now a Ph.D candidate in Dr. Gerard Ateshian's Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory. His research interests include cell membrane transport, cell homeostasis, mixture theory and multiphasic mechanics, finite element method and multiphasic modeling (FEBio).

    When off work, Chieh dedicates his time to his friends and families.

  • Research Interests

    • Musculoskeletal Biomechanics

    Education

    • Sc.B. Brown University, Mechanical Engineering, 2007
    • Sc.M. Brown University, Solid Mechanics, 2008
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2015

    Charlie first became interested in biomechanical research at Brown University, where he taught goats to walk on a treadmill for gait kinematic analysis. He is currently part of a collaborative effort between the Mechanical Engineering Department and the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Columbia University with Dr. Ateshian and Dr. Ahmad. Charlie's research focus is total shoulder arthroplasty and improving the efficacy of relevant surgical techniques and parameters.

    If not in lab, Charlie can be found skateboarding around NYC and photographing his adventures.

  • Research Interests

    • Soft tissue biomechanics
    • Finite element modeling
    • Medical device development

    Education

    • B.S. Clemson University, Mechanical Engineering, 2002
    • M.S. Clemson University, Mechanical Engineering, 2004
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, 2012
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, 2017

    Originally from Nashville, Tennessee, Brian joined Dr. Gerard Ateshian's Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory in 2010 working to measure in-situ joint friction. He defended his dissertation "Articular Cartilage Contact Mechanics and Development of a Bendable Osteochondral Allograft" in October 2016.

  • Research Interests

    • Osteoarthritis treatment
    • Software design
    • Device implantation
    • Stem cells

    Education

    • B.S. Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 2021

    About

    Prior to starting her M.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering, Brenna was a Biomedical Engineering undergraduate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Brenna has had a long held interest in Biomechanics, which drew her to the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Lab. At CWRU, Brenna engaged in research in Nanotechnology to improve nucleic acid immuno-therapies to treat lung cancer using liposomal drug delivery. She also worked in a neurophysiology laboratory developing software for a sacral nerve stimulation device for suppression of reflex urethral responses in spinal cord injury patients. 

  • Current Position

    Postdoctoral Fellow, Johns Hopkins University

    Research Interests

    • Mechanoelectrochemical behaviors of cartilage
    • Mixture theory applied to soft biological tissues
    • Finite element contact mechanics
    • Articular cartilage friction and damage
    • Reactive constrained mixture theory
    • Inelastic material behavior: plasticity, fatigue, damage

    Education

    • B.E. University of Delaware, Mechanical Engineering, 2014
    • M.S. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2016
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2018
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, Mechanical Engineering, 2020

    Awards

    • Columbia University H. Dean Baker Fellowship, 2018
    • Center for Teaching and Learning Lead Teaching Fellowship, 2017-2018
    • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, 2015   
    • Columbia University Presidential Fellowship, 2014

    Originally from Lancaster, PA, Brandon did his undergraduate work at the University of Delaware, studying temporomandibular joint friction and mechanics. His research interests led him to join MBL in the fall of 2014 as a Ph.D. candidate, where his work focused on understanding the mechanically mediated progression of osteoarthritis in articular cartilage. He used experimental, theoretical, and computational methods to explore composition-structure-function relationships in cartilage to inform models of articular fatigue and damage mechanics.

    In his spare time, Brandon enjoys running all over the island of Manhattan and wearing the shortest shorts in the lab.

    In 2020, Brandon received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in Mechanical Engineering. 

  •  

    Arul is rising Junior at Horace Mann School and is highly interested in the intersection of sciences, robotics and math. Currently, he is working on a program that links geometries from Comsol modeling software to runnable FEBio files, while allowing user input to determine what forces are applied to the model. In his spare time he likes to play golf and do card magic. 

  • Born and raised in Paris, Antoine is a visiting Master's student in Mechanical Engineering from Ecole Polytechnique in France performing his internship over the spring and the summer of 2015. His research project involves characterizing the growth and spatial mechanical properties of large engineered constructs throughout culture and finite-element modeling. Back in France, Antoine hopes to continue to translate his mechanical engineering skills into bioengineering applications. In his spare time, Antoine likes to explore New York City and especially enjoys exploring Chinese-American culture and walking through NYC's strangest neighborhoods. In addition, Antoine is a liberty lover and enjoys talking about US politics. Back home in France, he practices judo and karate.

  • Current Position

    Medical Director, Medical Strategy and Scientific Affairs • BGB Group

    Education

    • B.S. Tulane University, Biomedical Engineering, 2009
    • M.S. Tulane University, Biomedical Engineering, 2010
    • M.Phil. Columbia University, 2013
    • Ph.D. Columbia University, 2016

    About

    Hailing from Portland, Oregon, Alexander received both his BS and MS in Biomedical Engineering from Tulane University, and his Ph.D. from Columbia in Dr. Gerard Ateshian's Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory.  His research focused on cartilage tissue engineering, cartilage biomechanics, nutrient transport and extracellular matrix synthesis within engineered cartilage, and techniques for engineering large chondrocyte-agarose constructs to treat cartilage defects found in osteoarthritic joints.

  • Akaljot Singh

    Undergraduate Student

    Akaljot (AJ) is a Neuroscience major graduating in May 2015. He began his MBL work with Mike and Krista as a SURF student during the summer of 2013. His projects focus on maintaining homeostasis in cartilage explants (as measured by tissue stiffness, extracellular matrix production, and tissue swelling). Eager for more, he continued his work during the 2013-2014 academic year with the scope of his projects extending to also characterize the importance of TGF-Beta signaling in cartilage (via inhibitor supplementation) and studying the interaction of TGF-B with cortisol in cartilage tissue. AJ is originally from the Akron/Cleveland area of Ohio. He enjoys working in the lab, particularly while dressed up (as pictured). Outside the lab, he works as a Resident Adviser for the LLC (freshmen and sophomores) and as a Teaching Assistant for the undergraduate Genetics course. In his spare time, he enjoys watching Lost and Game of Thrones.

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